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Anyone can create an online course. On the other hand, making it an engaging and educational experience is a whole other question.
 
In this simulcast of FIR on Higher Education episode 7 with Kevin Anselmo, Comply Socially Founder Eric Schwartzman talks about how to make content interesting and educational in an online learning format. Eric has been conducting social media trainings in different parts of the world for several years. He recently took his courses online through his company which helps employers manage risk and scale engagement through innovative online social media training courseware.  He talks about how to deliver curriculum online versus in person, the importance of high quality production and the future of MOOCs, among other related topics.
 
Also on episode 7, Harry Hawk gives an update on how he has integrated Twitter into his classroom, while I provide a short book review on why Gini Dietrich’s new book Spin Sucks is an important read for higher education communicators, administrators and academics.
 
About Eric Schwartzman
Eric is the Founder and CEO of Comply Socially, which helps employers manage risk and scale engagement through innovative online social media training courseware. He is also the best-selling coauthor of Social Marketing to the Business Customer, the first book devoted exclusively to B2B social media communications. He’s been conducting live social media training programs to accelerate digital literacy in the workplace since 2004 and introduced online social media training in January 2013.
 
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About Your Host
Kevin Anselmo is the Founder and Principal of Experiential Communications, a consultancy focused on education. He helps brands within academia - whether individual or corporate - communicate with stakeholders. He also teaches communications and public relations workshops to different individuals and groups.
Previously, Kevin was Director of Public Relations for Duke University’s Fuqua School of Business and prior to that managed the media relations for IMD Business School in Switzerland. In addition, he was an adjunct communications professor at Nyack College in New York.
Currently based in Chapel Hill, North Carolina, Kevin lived and worked in Switzerland for eight years and in Germany for two years. He has led public relations initiatives in various countries around the world.
 
Find Kevin on Twitter: @kevinanselmo.
 
Share your comments or questions about this podcast, or suggestions for future podcasts, in the online FIR Podcast Community on Google+.
You can also send us instant voicemail via SpeakPipe, right from the FIR website. Or, call the Comment Line at +1 415 895 2971 (North America), +44 20 3239 9082 (Europe), or Skype: fircomments. You can tweet us: @FIRpodcast. And you can email us at fircomments@gmail.com. If you wish, you can email your comments, questions and suggestions as MP3 file attachments (max. 3 minutes / 5Mb attachment, please!). We’ll be happy to see how we can include your audio contribution in a show.
 
To receive all podcasts in the FIR Podcast Network, subscribe to the “everything” RSS feed. To stay informed about occasional FIR events (eg, FIR Live), sign up for FIR Update email news.
 
FIR on Higher Education is brought to you with Lawrence Ragan Communications, serving communicators worldwide for 35 years. Information: www.ragan.com.


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Social Media Crisis Prevention PanelEarlier this week the Los Angeles Chapter of the Public Relations Society of America hosted a panel discussion on what it takes to prevent a social media crisis.
 
In my opinion, PR spends too much time talking about crisis management and not enough time thinking about how to prevent them from happening in the first place.
 
 
The panel was moderated by Karen North, Chair of the Online Communities Graduate Program at USC and this is an audio recording of the discussion.
 
Panelists
Despite the PR industry's growing digital expertise, online crises continue to play out and leave professional communicators scrambling to minimize the damage. This panel is about what can be done to prevent these volatile situations in the first place.  This program examined recent high-profile digital disasters and what steps could have been taken to prevent them.
 
If you're interested in practical solutions for managing social media risk, check out out social media compliance training curriculum. They're all online, self-paced and ready to go.
 
Special thanks to chapter president Erik Deutsch (@ErikDeutsch) for producing the event and inviting me to participate.


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In this episode, sponsored by IBM Big Data, Dr. Marc Teerlink, Global Strategist & Data Scientist talks about separating the signal from the noise, using the past to predict the future and social media monitoring for ROI.

When you're dealing with Big Data, finding KPIs is tougher because there's more information to consider, so it's easier to get off course. We spoke to Marc will he was a drift, charting an unknown nautical course.

In this episode, Marc discusses:

  • How to use social media monitoring tools to prove a positive ROI
  • Why you can't predict the future based on the past, despite the fact that so many organizations try.
  • How Watson tells the difference between "write," "Mrs. Wright" and "right now."
  • Overcoming challenges associated with visualizing Big Data patterns.
  • Using the source of the data to disqualify erroneous speculation.
  • Why listening to teenagers is particularly challenging in the age of Big Data.
  • Why sentiment is particularly ill-suited to predicting outcomes.
  • Using impact, influence, sentiment and intent to make more confident predictions.
 
And much, much more.
 
About the Host:
 
Eric Schwartzman is CEO of social media training provider Comply Socially, which helps employers manage the risk and capitalize on the opportunities of social media in the workplace.  Follow him on Google+. and on Twitter @ericschwartzman.


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So you're using social media for business. And sometimes customers and prospects actually notice.  But you can't figure out how to scale engagement more consistently.
 
You need to get more people involved becuase on social networks, reach is a factor of engagement.  You've thought about getting your coworkers involved.
 
But they don't all know how to use social networks for business. And they're not skilled in the art of public disclosure.  They might make the mistake of saying something discriminatory or defamatory, or inadvertently leak proprietary information. And you could wind up a lot of hot water.
 
Altimeter Group social media analyst Ed Terperning (@edterpening), Plein Air Artist and Anders Zoren loyalist can help.  
 
His new report Social Media Education for Employees, coauthored with Charlene Li (@charleneli), details how organizations design and implement social media training programs for employees that reduce social media risk and activate employee advocacy programs at scale.

In this exclusive audio interview, Ed discusses the four different types of social media education programs, managing risks through social media policy training, social media training formats and modalities, motivating employees to complete on-demand courseware, required resources for keeping social media training courses current, strategies for knowledge transfer assessment and more.
 
You can download the report below.
 
Ballerina painting pictures above by Ed Terpening.
 
 
Ballerina painting above by Ed Terpening.


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IBM fellow Jeff Jonas (@JeffJonas) talks about Ironman Triathlons, how casinos catch card counters, the future of personal privacy and big data analytics.
 
indexJeff’s career is storied and diverse.  He’s built systems to protect the gambling industry from card counters, technology that allows organization’s to collect and analyze personally identifiable information without invading personal privacy and ways to make sense of data as it happens.
 
In this exclusive interview, sponsored by IBM, Jeff talks about pulling useful business intelligence from big data, comparing data points, why big data improves the accuracy of predictions, helping casino operators bring down the MIT Blackjack Team with data, the value of automated trading algorithms to Goldman Sachs, how Watson uses contradictory information to eliminate false positives, the shortcomings of pulling meaningful KPIs from social media monitoring services and sentiment analytics alone, the Fair Credit Reporting Act, why insufficient an observation space leads to fantasy analytics, the future of secrets and the importance of corporate training and business process improvement. 
 
About the Host:
 
Eric Schwartzman is CEO of social media training provider Comply Socially, which helps employers manage the risk and capitalize on the opportunities of social media in the workplace.  Follow him on Google+. and on Twitter @ericschwartzman.


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Marina Gorbis (@mgorbis) is executive director of the Institute of the Future and author of The Nature of the Future.  In this interview, she talks about how technology is changing the world of education, what motivates people to learn and digital literacy.
 
Here's a text transcript of her discussion with Eric Schwartzman, CEO of social media training provider Comply Socially.
 
Eric:  What is "socialstructing."
 
Marina:  There’s a new way we are creating value. The ways we're doing things that were not possible before are, all of a sudden, possible. The kind of things that previously you needed the whole organization to do, now you can do it with one person or a few people.
 
Sometimes, we can do unimaginable things with the power of these technologies and connections with each other. The idea is that we're creating. We're doing something in new ways. We're structuring things in new ways.
 
The other part of it is that the way we're doing it is through connections with others, when you're using social media, social technologies and ultimately connections to multitudes of others who we can engage in whatever activity we're doing.
 
Eric:  How do you see social media changing education in a professional context?
 
Marina:  One of the important things that we see is that a lot of education is moving out of institutions, and the kind of resources that previously resided just in organizations or were closed are now widely available.
 
Content itself has become a commodity. There's a lot of content. Almost anything you want to learn is out there between Khan Academy, Coursera, all the MOOCs ‑‑ but not just MOOCs, but all kinds of other platforms where people share.
 
WikiHow, Wikipedia ‑‑ you can think of Wikipedia as a learning resource. The content is all out there. It's moving from institutions into these flows. Imagine that there is a river of resources out there, and it's always there.
 
The challenge becomes, what makes people want to dip into those flows? What makes you motivated to dip into those information and content flows and ultimately learn?
 
Eric:  What motivates people to learn?
 
Marina:  What motivates people are very different things for different people. If you're a professional, and you need to learn, and you need to pass the test or exam, or you need it for your professional development, you can do that for that reason.
 
I think for all of us, a lot of the motivation is ultimately social. If you're a young person, your motivation to learn is to be in a conversation with the kind of people you want to be in a conversation.
 
If your social group is all about philosophy, you want to learn about philosophy. If your social group is about math or coding, you want to learn that. It's both for professional reasons, but a lot of that motivation is really social motivation for a lot of people.
 
That's why what's interesting is what I see happening is people signing up for online courses but then organize the meet‑ups in physical spaces with the same people who are taking the same course. There they engage in peer‑to‑peer counseling, and people learn from each other.
 
There's a lot of that going on. What's interesting is that they're bringing this online content and bringing it into social spaces.
 
Eric:  Several years back, people were speculating that, in the future, inner‑city folks, or people with less money wouldn't have access to the Internet, so there would be this digital divide between those that have access to the Internet and those that don't. Now, we're seeing that that's less of a factor.
 
Marina:  I think the kind of divide we're seeing is in agency and motivation, and that goes back to that social.
If you grow up in an environment where people don't read books and they're not motivated to learn, and they have different kinds of ideas about what's important in life, that's a kind of divide. Or if you don't have the self‑agency to engage in that and take advantage of all those resources out there and nobody's there to show you that that exists and those resources are out there...that's the kind of...I would say...it's motivation but also, it's social divide.
 
Eric:  It's interesting because originally we thought that technology would be this great leveler and it would put everyone on an equal playing field. Of course, Friedman, who mentioned you, speaking about the motivational divide in his column, wrote this book, "The Flat Earth," which says everyone will be on an equal playing field and big can compete with small.
I think a lot of us really believed that, but then we saw that the net result of all that information online was that...I guess some people who could collect that data and store that data would have an upper‑hand because obviously they could use that information against us.
 
Now that we're sort of moving into this era where we're starting to realize that when we take conversations to a public environment where they're recorded and stored, that information out of context could be used against us. What sort of education do you think people need moving forward to learn to be able to use these tools responsibly without creating some sort of archival record that could maybe someday haunt them?
 
Marina:  I'm not sure that you can totally avoid all of that information because it looks now the government gets the information and a lot of other people have access to the same information. I think media illiteracy is a critical part of education and talking about these issues...about what happens to this information and also where it's going to go because even the kinds of things that may be protected today, I always feel that whatever I put online is ultimately public information.
 
Whatever is private today may be public tomorrow. We may develop other kinds of techniques for protecting our information. I certainly hope so. For now, you just have to assume that all of that information is public in some way or another. I do think that media literacy is something that needs to be taught at a young age and it needs to be taught to adults also.
 
Eric:  For those that are growing up in this environment, they have an opportunity to learn as they grow, but for those of us who are living through the transformation, some of us need to be skilled later in life. Often, the skills we need aren't clear.
 
If you were charged with skilling a generation of digital immigrants ‑‑ and I know you say we're all immigrants to the future ‑‑ what specifically would you do to prepare the workforce of tomorrow to be able to participate in social media conversations without necessarily leaving a trail of digital breadcrumbs that could someday harm them?
 
Marina:  I've seen some really good media courses. Howard Rheingold teaches a course on media literacy that involves multiple components. First of all, understand that the kind of technology that is available...I'm constantly surprised how little people know about some of the platforms. For example, things like ODesk and Elance, for doing jobs and tasks and all kinds of interesting platforms.
 
In the future you look at these things all the time but not many people do, so just tracking and then just saying what technologies are out there and what's coming online is one thing.
 
The use of technologies and how you present information is a skill. Creating video is a new literacy also, so people need to be able to create video. You need to be able to assess the truthfulness of video and online text. There are all kinds of courses of interest in terms of how do you assess the veracity of this information. So all of those things are important. How do you communicate in email in user groups. How do you use comments and what's a good way to be online?
 
Eric:  Do you foresee subjects like privacy rights and surveillance rights of employers beings the types of things that workers need to be skilled in and you think that that becomes routine, part of the on‑boarding process that companies?
 
Marina:  I certainly think that that should be a routine, understanding how you use company email, understanding how you use instant messenger and apps that include access to that, all of that is very important.
 
I think it's in the interest of the employer to be transparent about it, because there's nothing worse when something happens and people find out that you were looking at their data.
 
Eric:  When you're doing your work at the Institute, it's one thing, obviously, to take a class from somebody like Howard Rheingold who's brilliant in the area of media business and is a futurist, but when you think about an organization, any organization with high turnover and a lot of entry‑level employees who may not have advanced degrees coming in and out of the ranks, if you have to teach these types of subjects to them, how do you do that, how do you make it so simple that anyone coming in for minimum wage or slightly higher job can learn things like privacy and disclosure and ethics and transparency?
 
Marina:  I see that as part of basic orientation. I think a lot of employers have orientation in which they talk about health benefits and other things that are just basic routines of the organization. I see that as being part of that orientation talking about data rights and data privacy and how to use online platforms whether they're probably provided by the company, all of those things I see as part of orientation.
 
Eric:  Tell us about the Institute for the Future.
 
Marina:  The institute has been around for 45 years. It is a non‑profit research organization originally spun out of Rand, the large research organizations. At the Institute, we're able to say "We don't predict the future. The purpose of thinking systematically about the future which is our mission is to help people make better decisions today."
 
So we use a whole variety of methodologists, scenarios, scanning, artifacts from the future, mapping, surveys, data, all kinds of techniques we say that they're methodologically agnostic. Ultimately, the purpose is to help people create that future landscape looking five, ten and more years out ask themselves questions "Well what do I need to do today or tomorrow to prepare for that future or shape a more desirable future?" Many have this process yet...
 
Eric:  Now, in terms of your role as Executive Director, you've been there a while now, how has the way you do what you do changed as a result of technology?
 
Marina:  We're experimenting with a lot of different platforms in terms of doing research. Some of our people use platforms like oDesk or Elance and others to engage more people in doing research with us and for us online.
We sometimes go experimenting in breaking down research tasks into smaller tasks and using people online in doing some of that work. I think that's a really exciting area of development. That's one area that we're really experimenting with.
 
The other area is we're using a lot of online platforms. We have a platform called the Foresight Engine, which uses some of the gaming elements and it engages large groups of people in thinking about the future together and what are some of the potential side effects of different scenarios. What are some of the exciting opportunities.
 
We have something thousands of people participating in a conversation. So, that's really exciting.
 
I guess the third area where we're changing is we are increasing from just being a research organization or thinking about the future. We're bringing people here who are called practical visionaries. People who are actually doing something that to us is a sign of the future and we fellowship here at the Institute with affiliates, working closely with them to help them in whatever things they're doing but also to bring their input into the Institute.
 
Eric:  Final question, total non sequitur. Looking at your bio, you've done some very high‑profile keynotes. You've keynoted the World Economic Forum. I can't imagine anything, from a keynote standpoint, more intimidating than that.
Talk to us a little bit about, from the emotional standpoint, what you go through before going on‑stage with the World Economic Forum to give a keynote and how you get through that.
 
Marina:  My largest presentation was for 5,000 people, and I've never seen 5,000 people assembled in one place for a presentation. That was a couple years ago, and it was just amazing and, of course, I was really worried but then it went really well and took me 20 minutes of terror, right?
 
After you've done that, nothing else scares you more. It's sort of "Oh, hundreds of people. I can do that."
I always try to, I never use the same speech so I always think about my audience and who the people in the audience are and varies whatever I'm saying depending on that.
 


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Inhi-blogpost
In this special episode sponsored by IBM, Big Data enthusiast, working mom, Duke Blue Devil, runner, cook, golfer and karate black belt Inhi Cho Suh (@inhicho), vice president and general manager of Big Data, Integration, & Governance at IBM, talks about the opportunities and risks of Big Data.
 
Topics discussed include:
 
  • Why should non-technical business people care about big data?
  • Transactional, machine, social and enterprise data
  • The difference between social media and social data
  • The risks of collecting, storing and analyzing social data
  • OODA: What it is and how it applies to big data
  • Applying sound IT governance practices to big data projects
  • Respecting the intellectual property rights of others on big data
  • We’ve talked about harnessing Big Data to deliver improved business outcomes, but what about political and social outcomes.
  • Using what Brazilian President Dilma Rousseff said at the UN after she learned her phone was being tapped as a guide, in your opinion, does freedom of expression depend on the right to privacy?
  • What if CIA director of intelligence James Clapper hired you to make the PRISM program more constitutional? Could you? How?
  • Privacy by design
 
About the Host:
 
Eric Schwartzman is CEO of social media training provider Comply Socially, which helps employers manage the risk and capitalize on the opportunities of social media in the workplace.  Follow him on Google+. and on Twitter @ericschwartzman.


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Social media marketing is no longer enough. You need a social media literate workforce, says Jeanne Meister, best-selling author of The 2020 Workplace.
 
Social media literacy is the understanding how to use social media both inside and outside the organization in a safe and secure way to improve their productivity and efficiency.
 
Jeanne Meister is an internationally recognized leader in creating innovations in the operation and management of an enterprise learning function. Jeanne’s expertise spans the development of a best practice corporate university to the creation of innovative social networks for learning.
 
Jeanne Meister’s newest book,The 2020 Workplace: How Innovative Companies Attract, Develop, and Keep Tomorrow’s Employees Today, co-written with Karie Willyerd, was published by Harper Collins in May 2010, and is now in its second printing! The book is available for purchase at all major book retailers.

Jeanne Meister is a co-founder of Future Workplace, an organization with a shared vision for re-imagining the current state of corporate learning & human resources development and helping to prepare companies for the 2020 workplace.

Recently, Jeanne was nominated and selected by her peers as “one of the top 20 most influential training professionals” by TrainingIndustry. Jeanne is a visionary thought leader, speaker, author and executive coach working with Chief Learning Officers and Presidents of for-profit universities in their quest to create award winning learning and development solutions, customized degree programs and industry specific certificate programs for market segments.
 
 
 
Topics discussed included:
 
  • Why some organizations a re steering away from issuing social meida policies.
  • The limitations of using employees and social media ambassadors
  • Reverser mentoring bomers with millenials
  • a much, much more.
About the Host:
 
Eric Schwartzman is CEO of social media training provider Comply Socially, which helps employers manage the risk and capitalize on the opportunities of social media in the workplace.  Follow him on Google+. and on Twitter @ericschwartzman.


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Scial Media Attorney Ryan Garcia
Drawing the line between what’s okay to share and what’s just too risky to share, the potential impact of the NSA PRISM surveillance program on the private sector and the top 5 things not to share on social media.
 
Social media training specialist Eric Schwartzman (@ericschwartzman) interviews Dell Computer social media attorney Ryan Garcia (@SoMeDellLawyer) about the impact of social media usage in the workplace of personal privacy and security.
 
Ryan has spoken at and chaired numerous social media legal conferences around the country. He has also been invited to speak on social media legal topics before American Bar Association committees, the Word of Mouth Marketing Association Summit, and the Game Developers Conference. Ryan frequently blogs about social media legal issues at somelaw.wordpress.com. New York Times technology columnist David Pogue has called Ryan the funniest Dell lawyer he knows.
 
Topics Addressed:
 
  1. Staying ahead of the legal issues that pertain to enterprise wide social media usage.
  2. Future proofing corporate social media training programs.
  3. Challenges of relying on sensational headlines for corporate social media education.
  4. The lack of attention people pay to the terms of service screens when signing up for online services of downloading apps.
  5. Risks of content ownership versus granting a non-exclusive, fully paid and royalty-free, transferable, sub-licensable, worldwide license.
  6. Importance of teaching people about the security and privacy risks of publishing geo-data.
  7. Discussion of setting limits on setting boundaries of what you share, since “publication is a self-invasion of privacy” as Marshall McLuhan once said.
  8. The top 5 things not sure on social networks.
  9. Potential impact of the NSA’s PRISM program on private sector usage of social media.
  10. What BYOD means for personal privacy and organizational security.
 
 Reference Links:
 
About the Host:
 
Eric Schwartzman is CEO of social media training provider Comply Socially, which helps employers manage the risk and capitalize on the opportunities of social media in the workplace.  Follow him on Google+. and on Twitter @ericschwartzman.


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What does it take to help a company become a social business? It takes the support of management and employees, and that requires education and enablement. Which is why Intel launched their Digital IQ social media training program.  Because they knew that without the buy-in of Intel’s 100,000 employees, social marketing would never be truly effective.
 
But where do you start?  You can’t boil the ocean. So Intel focused on training marketers first, before rolling the program out broadly. 
 
Rather than launch a social media center of excellence, they opted to build a social business at all levels of the enterprise. Their objective was to tap the power of an internal advocacy program that enabled everyone to help prospects and customers via social networks.
 
The Digital IQ program at Intel is organized like a higher education program with 60 classes organized into 4-tiers or levels of training. Some course are required, others are elective.  Entry level courses were digital so everyone had access on-demand. Intermediate courses were focused on enabling social media practitioners with live training. And advanced were very high-touch, one-on-one, interactive training sessions targeted to executives and SMEs.
 
How did they decide what was basic, and what was advanced?  Basic trainings were focused on answering the question of why.  Intermediate classes answered who and how.  And advanced classes really dug deeper into how at an even deeper level.
 
In this podcast, Eric Schwartzman (@ericschwartzman), founder and CEO of social media training provider Comply Socially talks to former Intel social media strategist Ekaterina Walter (@ekaterina).  Ekaterina was a member of the team that spearheaded the development of Digital IQ University at Intel.
 
 
Topics Addressed:
 
  1. Strategies for organizing tiered social media training programs
  2. Inside the different courses in the Digital IQ program
  3. How to design high-level, advanced social media training programs
  4. Social media crisis communications training
  5. Social media training programs by Comply Socially
  6. Benefits of classroom social media training vs. online social media training
  7. Biggest challenges associated with live social media training programs
  8. The biggest challenge of social media training programs
  9. Recommended lengths for online social media training courses
 
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Ekaterina is the best-selling author of Think like Zuck, The Five Business Secrets of Facebook's Improbably Brilliant CEO Mark Zuckerberg, which details why purpose, people, process and partnerships are the keys to success in the modern age.
 
Ekaterina Walters is Partner and CMO at Branderati. which provides software as a service to manage online advocacy programs though influencers relations.
 
About the Podcaster:
Eric Schwartzman specializes in social media training. His company Comply Socially, provides employers with blended social media training programs that help manage risk and scale engagement.  You can follow Eric Schwartzman on Twitter @ericschwartzman and also on Google+.
 


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